The 6 Most Creative Resumes and What You Should Learn From Them

creative resumes

The 6 Most Creative Resumes and What You Should Learn From Them

Recently I exchanged emails with a friend managing a new hire process for his company. “I’ve looked at enough resumes the last few weeks to last me a lifetime,” he wrote. Any candidate applying for a job in today’s market has to compete with up to hundreds of other applicants. How can job seekers possibly capture a recruiter’s attention when all resumes look the same?

While there are plenty of subtle ways to make a resume stand out, some job seekers have gone above and beyond active verbs, quantifiable achievements, and proper resume keyword selections. Here are six of the most creative resumes to ever make headlines—and what you should learn from them.

creative resumes

A resume formatted to look like Google search results netted the applicant an interview, but not the job. (Photo Credit: boredpanda.com)

1. The job: A position with Google.
The resume: The candidate, Eric, laid out his qualifications and experience to look like Google search results.
The result? Eric didn’t get the Google job he sought, but his resume’s creative formatting did land him an interview and quite a bit of online recognition! 
The lesson? 
According to Business Insider, the job he applied for was in Google’s marketing division. However, his resume featured the skills and experiences of a design professional. Having an eye-catching resume format is important, but tailoring each application you submit is crucial.

Enlist the help of Jobscan with the tailoring processour resume analysis tool identifies the important keywords in a job description for you to help you optimize your resume!

creative resumes

This cake resume made for a sweet, successful job application. (Photo Credit: blogs.zappos.com)

2. The job: An internal position at Zappos.
The resume: A red velvet cake professionally made to reflect one of Zappos’ core values: “be adventurous, creative, and open-minded.”
The result? The edible resume Pua, a Zappos customer loyalty team rep, sent in place of paper worked: she was selected for the position.
The lesson? As many an event  organizer will tell you, food does make a difference in getting people excited about something. However, the cake resume likely worked in large part because of the applicant’s existing knowledge of the company’s values and her familiarity with internal staff. Researching employers you want to work for is a key part of the job search process.

This crafty, hand-sewn approach definitely deserves a spot on our creative resumes list. (Photo Credit: mentalfloss.com)

This crafty, hand-sewn approach definitely deserves a spot on our creative resumes list. (Photo Credit: mentalfloss.com)

3. The job: The applicant’s first position following college.
The resume: The candidate, Melissa, printed her resume on white fabric and sewed copies to a variety of patterned fabrics.
The result? Using the fabric resumes did indeed land Melissa the job she was pursuing.
The lesson? Melissa chose this creative resume format because she wanted it to “really represent not only my design skills, but my affection for sewing and including handmade elements.” This thought process shows excellent awareness of what prospective employers in her industry were looking for. Just be sure that when creating and submitting resumes, you focus more on what an employer needs rather than your personal goals.

creative resumes

It’s hard to go wrong with chocolate, but make sure your resume format is industry-appropriate. (Photo Credit: reddit.com)

4. The jobs: Positions with various marketing firms.
The resume: A chocolate bar with the candidate’s profile information as “ingredients” and “nutrition facts.”
The result? The candidate, Nick, was offered two jobs in three months because of his sweet resume choice.
The lesson? This candidate clearly knew his target industry well, demonstrating his knowledge that marketing extends past products and into more intangible concepts like productivity. If you do use a non-traditional resume, make sure it’s appropriate for the job you’re seeking. “Think about the best way to highlight your skills for the position, and don’t hide a lack of experience behind a cool, out-of-the-box format,” writes HR pro Angela Smith at The Muse.

creative resumes

A t-shirt resume is definitely different, but is it your best jobseeking bet? (Photo Credit: cnn.com)

5. The job: Any full-time position job seeker Kelly could use to support her family.
The resume: A t-shirt with the candidate’s resume on the front and cover letter on the reverse side.
The result? Although the story of Kelly’s resume t-shirt was covered on major news networks, there’s a lack of follow-up reporting. Her bold job seeking strategy was highlighted in 2008.
The lesson? 
When an applicant uses an off-the-beaten-path resume and it goes viral, she or he may not receive the type of recognition they intended. The Today Show didn’t pull punches on the topic: “trying a crazy trick to get attention may even hurt your chances of landing a really good job, with an employer you want to work for.” If you want to use a creative resume, think carefully about how it will come across. A shirt emblazoned with “I need a job!” conveys desperation for any job, when what employers really want is someone who would be a great fit for a specific role.

creative resumes

An interactive resume video game where the jobseeker’s the hero? Cool and creative! (Photo Credit: http://rleonardi.com)

6. The job: Work in computer programming.
The resume: An interactive, animated resume taking inspiration from Super Mario Brothers!
The result? The candidate, Robby, created a finished resume product so strikingly different and of such high quality that news coverage centered around showcasing the work itself. “We’re pretty sure…he landed a job offer or 50,” according to Forbes.
The lesson? If you’re considering a creative resume, don’t just go for the zaniest idea you can come up with—come up with an idea that clearly showcases your strengths.

Creative resumes can be effective when used thoughtfully. Just make sure yours is right for your target industry, skills, and the specific job you want!

See also:

Top Resume Formats in 2015

Change Your Resume Objective into a Career Summary

8 Things You Need to Know About Resume Keywords

10 Awesome Resume Templates

Doctor’s Orders: Top 8 Tips on Resumes for Medical Professionals

Resumes for Medical Professionals

Doctor’s Orders: Top 8 Tips on Resumes for Medical Professionals

“The medical field.” It’s only three words long, but the phrase encompasses hundreds of different occupations and a rapidly growing employment sector of the American economy. With such a vast array of specialized positions available in medicine, job seekers must ask and answer the following question: What should go on effective resumes for medical professionals?

resumes for medical professionals

Don’t be scared of writing your medical resume—it hurts much less than a shot.

Start with this neatly bisected list of eight tips to craft your answer.

Exam room one: helpful hints for medical professionals.

1. Emphasize your education. Most prospective employers want to see your skills and work history on a resume well before any educational details. Not so in the medical field! Many positions within medicine require extremely specific degrees and certifications. The school you went to can also be much more important in medicine than it is in other fields. Schools develop reputations for being competitive or demanding, or for excellence in certain specialties. Place the Education section near the top of your resume and give hiring managers an immediate sense of your schooling.

2. Don’t skimp on skills. Whether you’re an osteopath or an optometrist, your new job in medicine is going to draw on a highly specialized skill set. Honed skills are important in any occupation—but because the medical field involves making decisions that directly affect human lives, demonstrating your capabilities takes on greater importance. Take a look at these two sample resumes, for a Pharmacist and Certified Medical Assistant, from Monster. Both have prominent skill sections, and include technical as well as patient-focused abilities. Soft skills are especially important for patient-facing roles.

Resumes for medical professionals

Resumes for medical professionals should include specialized skills that align with each individual job description.

3. Perfect the personal statement. A personal statement is an incredibly important part of applying to schools in the field of medicine. Prospective nurses, physicians, mental health counselors, and even pharmacists must include one with their AMCAS application. However, it’s also a great tool for your healthcare resume, serving the same function as a career summary in other professional sectors.

The Princeton Review has an excellent set of tips on writing personal statements, including that “good medical students—and good doctors—use clear, direct language.” A personal statement is your chance to explain why you want a career in medicine, and to highlight your accomplishments so far. Use it to captivate the reader’s attention and make yourself stand out.

4. Take time to tailor. At Jobscan we urge applicants to tailor resumes in all sectors of work, and experts on medical resume writing agree. “Health care human resources staffers and recruiters know the typical duties for nurses, orderlies, and medical technicians. So, if you’re applying for a job that requires certain skills or experiences, it won’t do any good to provide a summary of routine duties,” according to the Houston Chronicle. Your resume should instead convey your individual experiences and accomplishments—and tie those back to the specific job you are seeking. Tailoring your resume also gives the employer a sense of how well you follow procedures—which is key to any medical career.

Once you have your first resume draft done, run it through Jobscan’s resume optimization tool and make sure it’s tailored to perfection! Thanks to the personalized results you’ll get from Jobscan’s resume analysis, you can effectively present yourself as a match for your desired position.

Exam room two: words of wisdom from medical professionals.

These insights come directly from people in various stages and specialties of the medical profession.

5. “Process improvement/quality improvement projects are popular now. This is basically looking at systems of care and finding small changes that can be implemented. You measure how effective you were at it before the change and how effective the process is after, and hopefully it got better. That would relate to a job application in that you could say for an ‘X’ size clinic, we were able to see ‘N’ more patients, or work ‘Y’ more efficiently/effectively. Medical folks love data…hard numbers to show what you can bring to the organization.” —A physician in the Army, practicing family medicine

resumes for medical professionals

Much of healthcare now happens in teams. Your resume should indicate how well you worked with those around you.

6. “I made sure to emphasize my direct interactions with patients [in my resume]. Practitioners and admin staff alike are usually pretty willing to train new hires in highly specific and technical procedures. It’s easier to do that than, say, try to teach someone how to have a proper bedside manner.” —Second-year medical student

7. “When I hire someone, I am usually looking for an individual with a personality that will connect with our patient population and stakeholders. Most people have a lot of the same skill set these days. If a resume could convey something about how well the author connects with patients, clinic staff, and medical providers, the prospective employer might take notice.” —Program staff member at Rehabilitation Institute of Washington

resumes for medical professionals

You certainly CAN appeal to Asclepius—the Greek god of healing—for help with your medical-industry resume, but try using keywords and quantifiable results first. (Photo credit: squidoo.com)

8.  “I used to work with students who were applying to residency training programs after finishing medical school—and that is a lot like a resume. Keywords [and keyword phrases] often included:
A. ‘History of hard work’ in medical school
B. ‘Motivated by compassion for persons’ to enter healthcare
C. ‘Have learned the importance of communication (I listen to my patients)’
D. ‘This is a job that I find interesting’
E. ‘I enjoy being a team player’—as healthcare is usually carried out by a team these days.” —Medical ethics expert at the University of Washington

Take more than two of these tips, and I bet prospective employers will call you in the morning!

See also:

8 Things You Need to Know About Resume Keywords

Resume Examples: Keywords for Biomedical Engineering

Top 3 Blogs for Healthcare Jobs

Resume Examples: Keywords for Registered Nurses

Top 3 Blogs for Education Jobs

Top 3 Blogs for Education Jobs

Top 3 Blogs for Education Jobs

While the summer heat isn’t waning as August draws to a close, a sure sign of fall on the horizon has already materialized in some places around the country: students heading back to school.

Educational professions are a common vocational choice in my family. From college professors to elementary school teachers, I am surrounded by incredible passion for learning and instructing. Thus, readers who share in the desire to educate, I salute you with the utmost respect! However, all the zeal and motivation in the world aren’t going to help if you don’t know where to look for education jobs—so check out these top blogs as part of your career lesson planning.

Gone are the days of searching for education jobs in print. Use these blogs to get good results.

Gone are the days of searching for education jobs in print. Use these blogs to get good results.

1. Teach.comEducation is an extremely complex art. As such it’s fitting that Teach.com offers information and help on a multitude of subjects within the broader teaching profession. (The site is linked to USC, so you’ll see lots of ads for their graduate programs, but its content is worth the plugs.)

The most notable feature of the site itself isn’t a specific education jobs search engine, but rather the “Get Your Teaching Job” section. This portion of Teach.com clearly articulates the different components of a successful search for K-12 positions, and offers links to 15 education-specific job databases such as Teachers-Teachers!

As for the blog, it averages three to four posts per month and sports several different types of articles: Q&As, feature pieces on specific educators, educational conference (such as SXSWEdu) wrap-ups, and recommended tech resources.

Three key posts:

10 Reasons to Blog as Professional Development

Finding Your Niche: Teach100Mentors Talk Transitions

7 Innovative Apps for Parent-Teacher Communication

education jobs

Bluto can’t believe all the pressure higher education professionals are under, and wants you to use these job search resources. (Photo Credit: theguardian.com)

2. VitaeVitae is an extremely comprehensive collection of resources solely for higher education professionals. You can use the basic job search function without creating a (free) account, but signing up does offer some nice benefits, including saved job searches.

The “Get News & Advice” section of Vitae’s site is authored by a wide variety of writers, and contains incredibly diverse content. From forum discussions about what to do on the first day of class to advice regarding department politics, the blog is both informative and entertaining. (And frequently updated!)

Three key posts:

Long-Distance Networking

The Sound of Silence

The Importance of Writing Skills in Tech-Related Fields

education jobs

Finding a great education job is the perfect way to maintain your excitement for teaching. (Photo Credit)

3. SchoolSpring. SchoolSpring doesn’t actually have a separate blog, but I’m making a curriculum choice and including it here anyway. Instead of limiting its education jobs to either K-12 or higher education positions, it includes every grade level from preschool to post-secondary.

Significantly, this resource also produces results for administrator jobs in addition to the array of teaching positions. A good administrative team works with teachers to create positive school climates and environments with professional development, so it’s important to get quality candidates (like you, if you’re looking in that sector of the profession) in those jobs!

Three key tools:

Find a Job (Advanced Search)

Facebook Page

Profile Form (Free sign-up; this gives you the ability to create job alerts and saved searches)

education jobs

Jaime Escalante’s passion for education helped him push students to succeed. (Photo Credit: lataco.com)

Once you have your target jobs lined up, head over to Jobscan and make sure that your resume aligns with the specific job openings you’ve decided to pursue. Educators need reliable resources throughout their careers, and we want to provide one for you!

Extra Credit: If you’re a K-12 professional, be sure to check out Edmodo once you’ve secured that fantastic education job. A free tool featuring classroom management resources, the capability to share assignments with students, and a frequently updated blog, Edmodo helps teachers stay organized.

Class dismissed!

See also: 

Resume Format: Your Education Section

Top 3 Blogs for Finance Jobs

Vocational Visuals: The 3 Best Resume Tips Videos

Resume Examples: Keywords for Biomedical Engineering

Resume Examples: Keywords for Biomedical Engineering

Resume Examples: Keywords for Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical engineering is an interesting and challenging field, requiring knowledge of biology, medicine, and more, on top of typical engineering knowledge. It’s also a field poised for growth. “Employment of biomedical engineers is projected to grow 27 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations,” according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook. “Demand will be strong because an aging population is likely to need more medical care and because of increased public awareness of biomedical engineering advances and their benefits.”

If you’re interested in pursuing biomedical engineering, reading some resume examples from those already in the field can help you learn about expectations, necessary skills, potential hurdles, career trajectories, and more.

The word cloud above was created using the text of 10 biomedical engineering job listings. The larger the word, the more times it appeared.

Mechanical engineering resume keywords

  • Analysis
  • Bachelor’s
  • Biological
  • Biomedical
  • Clinical
  • Data
  • Degree
  • Design
  • Development
  • Device
  • Engineering
  • Equipment
  • Healthcare
  • Master’s
  • Materials
  • Mechanical
  • Medical
  • Problem-solving
  • Product
  • Research
  • Results
  • Team
  • Technical
  • Testing

Notes on biomedical engineering keywords

Highlighting your education properly is going to be more important for current or aspiring biomedical engineers than for those in most other industries. It is a relatively new field, and more and more schools are adding programs or expanding offerings. More importantly, this is the first field for which we’ve done a round-up of resume keywords where “master’s degree” was mentioned as a prerequisite for so many jobs that it wound up on our list of top keywords.

biomedical engineering resume examples

Biomedical engineers often choose to specialize. Be sure your resume makes your area of focus clear.

Many biomedical engineers wind up choosing a specialty area, such as a particular disease, organ, or technology (for example, implants or drug delivery). Having the right keywords is especially critical if you’re applying for a biomedical engineering job with a particular focus. A career summary is an ideal way to lead off your resume with those relevant keywords. If your resume lacks the right keywords, an applicant tracking system (ATS) is almost certainly going to pass you over.

Don’t forget to pay attention to slight differences, such as “laboratory” vs. “lab” or “healthcare” vs. “health care.” ATS are always getting more sophisticated, but almost every single one still looks for exact keyword matches.

Targeting your resume

To learn how well your resume matches up with the biomedical engineering job of your choice, try Jobscan’s resume analysis tool. Your instant feedback will include a match rating, plus suggestions for optimizing your resume keyword usage and your resume as a whole. Resume examples are a valuable resource for research, but nothing can beat individualized, targeted feedback.

See also:

20 Best ATS-Friendly Resume Examples

Top Resume Skills for 2015

Change Your Resume Objective Into a Career Summary

8 Things You Need to Know About Applicant Tracking Systems

Writing a Resume Summary? Don’t Make These 5 Mistakes!

resume summary

Writing a Resume Summary? Don’t Make These 5 Mistakes!

At times crafting a resume is like trying to dress for Pacific Northwest weather—that is, it’s frustrating. (And involves many layers!) When you’ve got to be mindful of everything from keyword selection to font choice, the entire process feels overwhelming. Yet there is one component of modern resume writing that can be fun: the resume summary.

The purpose of a resume summary, also known as a career summary, is to give your next employer a sense of not only what you can do but also who you are. This in turn gives you the opportunity to reflect on your accomplishments, think about where your career is going, and remember what makes you different from any other candidate. In short, it’s a resume ego boost!

resume summary

Job searching can be depressing. Use the process of creating a resume summary to liven it up a bit. (Photo credit: Buzzfeed.com/carolynkylstra)

A resume summary can positively influence a hiring manager if done right. Here’s what NOT to do with yours:

1. Don’t drone on forever. Just like the other components of your resume, a resume summary needs to be easily readable. Whether you use bullet points or sentences, fit them together to flow nicely. Writing for The Muse, Lily Zhang suggests using “four to six bullet points” that “don’t regurgitate your resume bullets.” Be concise. . .but creative!

resume summary

Bashful the dwarf is adorable, but not a good role model for your resume summary. (Photocredit: wikihow.com)

2. Don’t be shy! If your career experiences are laced with teamwork, it’s tempting to frame those experiences in a manner that ensures you don’t take too much credit. Words such as “assisted,” “helped,” and “contributed” then start to sneak into your resume summary. But in reality, your best bet is to be bold! Use the first person and highlight your accomplishments.

3.  Don’t use the passive voice. Which of the following statements sounds better to you? A) “Was coaching a women’s soccer team when they won an international tournament” or B) “I’m a soccer coach with 20 years of experience leading teams at the collegiate, semi-pro, and professional levels. I have a proven winning track record, including the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup.” Your career accomplishments are exciting and noteworthy. Surround them with active voice words!

resume summary

A resume summary isn’t about your goals, but rather those of the team you’ll be joining. (Photo credit: usatoday.com)

4. Don’t talk about your goals. The key to a good resume summary is to tout your accomplishments in the context of how they’ll help your future employer. This is because every time a company posts a job opening, it means that entity needs something. Present yourself as the right candidate to meet that need. As Jane Heifetz writes in the Harvard Business Review, “[t]his immediately tells the hiring manager that you’ve solved the same types of problems she’s dealing with.”

If the job description calls for a “leader of cross-functional marketing teams” and you have that type of experience, part of your career summary could say, “I have led cross-functional teams in successfully meeting sales quotas in excess of $5M.” It’s your accomplishment—but it benefited someone else.

And, very importantly. . .

resume summary

Keywords are crucial to an effective resume. (Photo Credit: mashable.com)

5. Don’t forget the keywords! Although a resume summary needs to impress human recruiters, don’t forget that an applicant tracking system (ATS) will likely still scan it for the presence of keywords—and rank your resume accordingly. Use your resume summary as another way to incorporate these crucial phrases and increase your resume’s chances of beating the ATS.

To make sure you’ve got the right keywords and an appropriate usage frequency (too many keywords could get your resume penalized; too few means your application is likely to go unnoticed), run your shiny new summary and the rest of your resume through Jobscan. You’ll instantly get a personalized report that shows you which words you’re missing, which you could modify, and more.

resume summary

Thankfully you won’t turn to ashes if you pick the wrong keywords, but it’s still important. (Photo Credit: safaribooksonline.com)

A quality resume summary can make all the difference in a job search. Avoid these mistakes while creating yours!

See also:

Change Your Resume Objective into a Career Summary

8 Things You Need to Know About Resume Keywords

20 Best ATS-Friendly Resume Examples

Resume Writing: Less is More

3 Ways Hurling Can Help You Write the Perfect Resume

perfect resume

3 Ways Hurling Can Help You Write the Perfect Resume (Photo Credit: thurles.info)

Yes, you read the title right. No, it has nothing to do with vomiting.

Hurling is the national sport of Ireland, that green oasis where kindness flows as freely as the River Liffey. Over 3,000 years old, the sport is known as “the fastest game on grass”—and happens to be my favorite thing in the world.

Concepts from hurling can help to provide fresh perspectives on many things in life. In this case we’ll use it to tackle the following question: How does one write the perfect resume?

perfect resume

Croke Park’s hurling pitch in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo Credit: thehitmachinedrummers.com)

1. Know the playing field. Hurling matches take place on grass pitches that are slightly longer and narrower than soccer fields. At the top levels in Ireland each team has 15 players per side, with both squads attempting to score through rugby-like uprights located at the ends of the pitch. While the rules of each match are the same, every individual game differs in content and outcome. You can’t play your best without first knowing what you’re up against.

Understanding the playing field is just as important in resume writing. Resumes submitted in today’s job market will likely encounter two different defenders: 1) software platforms called applicant tracking systems (ATS) and 2) human recruiters. Forbes estimates that 75 percent of resumes submitted for each job opening are immediately rejected by an ATS. Get familiar with what an ATS looks for before you submit your next resume. Don’t forget to consider your human audience, too—to impress a recruiter, your resume needs to be convincing and concise. The more you know about defenders, the better your chances of getting past them.

perfect resume

A sliotar and hurley work together to make hurling great—just like you should team up with resume keywords. (Photo Credit: kclr96fm.com)

2. Use the correct terminology. Every sport has a unique set of terms, and hurling is no exception. Here are a few of the basics:

  • Sliotar: A hurling ball. About the same size as a baseball, but less dense.
  • Hurley: The hurling stick. Made of ash or synthetic materials, it’s a flat, somewhat axe-shaped tool.
  • Puck-out: The goalie’s method of hitting a sliotar back into the field of play following a score.

At my team’s next practice, if I refer to my stick as a “bat” instead of a”hurley,” I’ll get funny looks from my teammates. Although they’ll ultimately understand what I’m referring to, why not just use the correct terms?

perfect resume

In the case of using correct keywords, absolutely.

This same principle applies to your resume. Each job posting contains the exact keywords that both the ATS and the human recruiter want to see. To ensure that you’re using proper keywords with the appropriate frequency, run your resume through Jobscan’s analysis tool. The resulting report gives you a score showing how closely your resume matches the job description, and offers targeted suggestions to help you achieve that perfect resume.

perfect resume

You don’t have to go to hurling practice to show off your skills—make them stand out on your resume instead. (Photo Credit: www.bc.edu)

3. Showcase your skills. I always like to call hurling the “sport of options” when I’m coaching a new player. The moniker fits because there’s such a wide variety of ways to move the ball up the field: you can tap it off your palm, hit it on the ground, strike it in the air, balance it on your stick while running, or even kick it! This means, though, that there are a lot of different skills to master. The best hurlers are the ones who not only develop a full skill set, but also use it to benefit the entire team.

Similarly, the skills on your resume are much more than just a list of what you can do. When incorporated into a succinct career summary, they show an employer how you’ll use your experience to help them achieve their goals. Additionally, a resume skills section is an excellent spot for more of those crucial keywords. (Don’t blindly stuff keywords into your resume, though–that’s one way to get your resume red carded.)

perfect resume

Don’t let this happen to your resume! (Photo Credit: www.rte.ie)

Hurling was originally used by Celtic kings to train warriors for battle, and thus it’d be easy to think the game is all brawn and no brains. But just as in resume writing, strategy matters greatly when seeking victory on the pitch. Take these tips from the oldest field sport in the world and score big with your new perfect resume!

Sláinte! (Cheers!)

See also:

8 Things You Need to Know About Applicant Tracking Systems

Top Resume Skills for 2015

8 Things You Need to Know About Resume Keywords

20 ATS-Friendly Resume Examples

Top 3 Blogs for Finance Jobs

finance jobs

Top 3 Blogs for Finance Jobs

The number of finance jobs in the United States has steadily increased over the course of 2015. “Over the year,” reports the Bureau of Labor Statistics, “employment in financial activities [has] increased by 156,000, compared to 79,000 jobs added in the prior months.” In fact, 17,000 finance jobs were added last month alone.

As a result, if you’re looking to become an insurance agent, accountant, financial analyst, or real estate professional, the jobs are out there. But where can you find them? And just as important, what can you do to increase your chances of getting one?

Start with reading these three blogs.

finance jobs

Robert Half’s Accounting & Finance blog offers practical career-specific tips.

1. Robert Half Finance & Accounting Blog

Robert Half’s main site is a gold mine (or is that gold-standard mine?) for finance jobs, which makes perfect sense—the company’s main function is to connect finance professionals with employers.

Helpful sections of the RH homepage include the advanced job search tool for finance positions, an Accounting and Finance Salary Guide, and the Industry Research tab that includes free resources on topics ranging from digital media etiquette to resume tips.

The blog itself is easily searchable by topic (including career advice) and averages one to two posts a week.

Three key posts:

Careers in Finance: Hiring Advice for Starting Your Search

7 Accounting Services Poised for 2015 Growth

Want More Bang For Your Buck? 5 Finance Certifications to Consider

finance jobs

With a youthful voice and plenty of content, eFinancialCareers is a great source for financial sector news.

2. eFinancialCareers 

This site is truly a one-stop shop for those seeking business careers: finance job postings, the ability to create a searchable resume, and detailed company profiles (to help with the all-important task of resume tailoring!) all make appearances.

There “News & Advice” section has short, easily digestible articles designed to equip job seekers with the latest tips. In an industry that can shift quicker than an online trade, the combination of quality and relevance is crucial! At least five new articles get posted every day, so there’s no shortage of content.

Three key posts:

The New Perfect Personality for Working in Banking

10 Skills that Finance Recruiters Really Want Now

Fintech is Red Hot, But Taking a Job Could Be a Big Risk

finance jobs

The “Insights” blog from the Stanford Graduate School of Business is academic but still accessible.

3. Insights by Stanford Business

Top Universities recently gave Stanford the #3 spot on its “Top 10 Universities for Accounting & Finance in the World” list, so it came as no surprise to me that the Cardinal’s Graduate School of Business (GSB) has its own site and blog with abundant resources.

GSB’s job board is only accessible to alumni, but the slate of other tools is vast. Check out the Job Resources section for information on global recruiting firms, interviewing, negotiating, and other helpful tips.

As for the Insights blog, look to the Finance, Accounting, and Career & Success topic sections for quality business sector information. Posts within each of these sections come out about two to three times per month at most, but many are authored by university scholars and filled with comprehensive research.

Three key posts:

Five Steps to Better Negotiating

Six Reasons to Rethink Aging and Retirement

A Culture of Silence Can Hurt a Firm

Once you’ve bookmarked these sites, you’re ready to move forward in your search for a finance job. Don’t forget to visit Jobscan and use our resume analysis tool to get your application in top shape for Wall Street!

See also:

Job Search Tips for 2015

Top 3 TED Talks for Job Seekers

20 ATS-Friendly Resume Examples

Writing a Finance Resume

How Long Should a Resume Be?

how long should a resume be

How Long Should a Resume Be?

Conflicting advice is one of the most frustrating aspects to job seeking, and there are few topics that divide the career experts more than one simple question: How long should a resume be?

“Provide the most-important information about you and your experience on one page—rarely is the second page even glanced at.” —Peter Economy (a.k.a The Leadership Guy), via Inc.com

“Your resume should be no longer than one page. Keep your audience interested in five- to 10-second increments to keep them scrolling and reading. If that is one page, so be it. If that is three pages, okay.” —Lisa Rangel, executive resume writer, via Fast Company

how long should a resume be

Conflicting resume tips got you facepalming?

These are just two voices within the multitude opining on resume length. With so many different stances, there is a lot of noise and little clarity. So what’s a job seeker to do? Let’s examine some of the most common arguments on resume length.

Argument #1: Two-page resumes get lost in piles. (Also known as: people hate staples.) 

How long should a resume be? Keep the robots in mind—they read it first

Widespread use of applicant tracking systems means your resume gets read by a robot first.

This is a good argument when it comes to job fairs or one-on-one networking situations. But with more than 90 percent of employers using applicant tracking systems (ATS) to screen applicants, it’s important to be realistic about who—or what—is reading your resume in 2015. These days, the first entity to see your resume is nearly always going to be a software platform.

While ATS do place great importance on resume keywords and clean formatting, they don’t consider resume length when rating candidates. Basically, your first consideration when crafting a resume should be, “how well does my resume align with the job description?” (Pro tip: Jobscan can help you answer that question with our resume analysis tool.)

Argument #2: A recruiter won’t read an entire two-page resume. 

Once your resume successfully gets past the ATS, it will indeed get to a set of human eyes. But if your career content doesn’t captivate the recruiter, it doesn’t matter how long the document is. Recruiters and human resources professionals spend an average of 7 seconds looking at your resume in the quick scan stage, during which their eyes are reviewing your name, titles and dates associated with your last two jobs, and your education. That’s about it. If they have to hunt through tightly-packed lines for this information, you and your resume are out of luck.

how long should a resume be

Would you spend 7 seconds with this resume. . .
(Photo credit: bestsampleresume.com)

how long should a resume be

. . .or this one?
(Photo credit: bespokeresumedesign.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Argument #3: A two-page resume means you’re including irrelevant content. 

The instrument you played in high school is important to your parents and nobody else. Whether you’re an entry-level job seeker or applying for an executive-level position, recruiters are looking for detailed examples of leadership, collaboration, and measurable results. Resume padding is easy to spot, especially for people who look at resumes all day, every day.

Be strategic about what content you include (again, use the job description as your guide), but don’t sell yourself short. You’ve worked hard to build your work history—and your prospective employer wants to know how you’ll use your experience to achieve their goals.

Employers want to see your experience with profit margins, not your resume margins.

Employers want to see your experience with increasing profit margins, not decreasing resume margins. (Photo credit: eBay)

Bottom line: It’s way more important to spend your time identifying keywords and properly showcasing your skills than to spend hours messing with margins or typefaces to get everything to fit onto one page. Tailor your resume for each individual application, and don’t worry if it fills a second page. How well your resume is targeted for the job you want is more important than its length.

See also:

Resume Format: Things To Know About Using a Second Page

Resume Writing: 2 Rules You Can Break

20 ATS-Friendly Resume Examples

8 Things You Need to Know About Resume Keywords

3 Key Tips to Improve Your Resume Layout

resume layout

3 Key Tips to Improve Your Resume Layout

Keywords. Skills. Proper fonts. Measurable results. There are many components that a resume absolutely must have in this age of applicant tracking systems (ATS). With so much energy spent on content, it’s easy to forget about the importance of presenting that content through a solid resume layout.

When asked by Huff Post Business to identify terrible resume mistakes, an HR associate at the securities firm EquiLend offered, “It does not matter where you are in terms of your experience level, but to me poor formatting just suggests that you did not pay attention to what you were doing and shows me your lack of interest.” This advice sounds good on the surface, but what exactly does “poor formatting” mean?

Here are 3 keys to a good layout—and how you can use them to unlock a professional, effective resume.

Keeping your layout clean is key to overall resume success. Photo credit: comicvine.com

Keeping your layout clean is key to overall resume success. (Photo credit: comicvine.com)

1. Keep it clean. Because the average recruiter only takes about seven seconds to review a resume, it’s tempting to include as many eye-catching features as possible in order to keep their attention. Charts! Graphs! A veritable rainbow of font colors!

However, this presumes that those of the human persuasion will be the only ones reviewing your resume—which is unfortunately untrue. The applicant tracking systems mentioned above save employers time, but present some hurdles for job seekers.

One issue is that only some ATS can recognize tables, columns, or various other graphic elements. To be on the safe side, your resume instead “should include clean lines and a different (non-neon) font color to highlight job titles,” opines Maele Hargett, an executive recruiter with Ascendo Resources.

Uniformity contributes to a successful resume layout.

2. Keep it uniform. If you’ve been copying and pasting into a resume from your career management document, there may be some small inconsistencies that have escaped your notice. Combat this in one of two ways: either a) paste text into Windows Notepad/TextEdit for a Mac to get rid of any formatting, or b) use the “Clear All Formatting” button in Microsoft Word.

Bullet points should all be the same size and the paragraph style needs to be consistent across the board. Remember that once your resume does get past the ATS, it will be seen by a human recruiter—and if the resume’s sections are cramped or look starkly different from one another, you’re making it hard for that recruiter to notice your talents. If your resume looks sloppy, potential employers will think you are, too.

resume layout

Microsoft Word’s “Clear All Formatting” button is a good tool to use in keeping your resume layout clean.

3. Keep your options open. If you’d rather let someone else do the layout work, use a resume template! Templates make it easy to properly showcase your skills, experience, and accomplishments. Be cautious though, and don’t use just any old template. Many available options come pre-loaded with graphics and charts, which we’ve already established can throw off applicant tracking systems.

So where can one find an uncluttered, yet eye-catching template? Jobscan has compiled 20 high quality, ATS-friendly templates that we encourage you to explore here. Best of all, they’re free—a far cry from the $99 price tag on some resume templates!

Jobscan gives you the best of both worlds: resume analysis and free templates!

Jobscan gives you the best of both worlds: resume analysis and free templates!

Resume layout is a subtle but important part of creating the document that tells your career story. Keep these 3 keys in mind to impress humans and ATS alike!

See also:

Top Resume Formats in 2015

20 Best ATS-Friendly Resume Examples

To Err is Not Just Human: 3 Ways to Beat an ATS

8 Things You Need to Know About Applicant Tracking Systems

Vocational Visuals: The 3 Best Resume Tips Videos

resume tips

Vocational Visuals: The 3 Best Resume Tips Videos

Writing a resume is an extremely difficult task to begin with. What can be even more challenging, though, is finding the right resources to help you complete that task. The flood of resume advice out there is overwhelming—so we’ve done some searching for you! Check out these three videos to pick up some useful resume tips.

Title: How To Write A Great Resume and Cover Letter
Created By: Harvard Extension School
Sound Bite: “Then as you write each of your sentences or phrases, you want to say to yourself, ‘So what? Big deal. I did that. How did I make a difference?'”

 

Title: How Recruiters Read Your Resume…in 7 Seconds!
Created By: Careerly
Sound Bite: “A recruiter’s eyes are basically going to scan the name, education, the names of companies, and the length of time that [you] worked at those companies.”

 

Title: How to Write a Resume (Like A Wizard!)
Created By: How To Adult
Sound Bite: “Remember that applicant tracking systems—those robo-readers—they can’t read infographics!”

Whether you attended Harvard or Hogwarts, these resume tips are perfect if you’re stuck on how to tell your professional story. Once you’ve incorporated the advice, head over to the Jobscan resume analysis tool and make sure your resume is optimized so it will reach a recruiter’s eyes!

See also:

Top Resume Formats in 2015

20 Best ATS-Friendly Resume Examples

5 Things You Need for Proper Resume Format

Top 3 TED Talks for Job Seekers